John Stewart

Blue: For Earth, For Humanity, For Freedom

While much media (and political) hype points to climate change and global warming as the cause, it is not a simple answer.  The 20th Century was one of the three wettest centuries within the past 1,250 years.  The 20th Century (1922 to be exact) is the base year for water allocation from the Colorado River.  California draws a considerable amount of Colorado River water.While the Rocky Mountains have experienced reduced snow pack, the Sierra Nevada Mountains have also experienced reduced snow pack for a number of years.  This is where the media (and political) hype focus on climate change.  Well, yes, the “climate” is changing; just as it has been changing for many centuries.  While the media (and political) hype focuses on the human element and the need to combat climate change, the scientific community is seeking to understand the effects of the changing environment and determine what impacts the changing climate will have on wildlife, plant like and human life.With respect to the presentation Blue, I have been seeing similar comments supporting an anti-climate change/environmentist perspective.  It is interesting when you learn that the demise of the polar ice caps is based on 1979 as the baseline year; the first year LANSAT photos of the world were available.  Coincidentally, that year was towards the end of a 30+ year documented cooling trend and the polar ice caps were expanded from normal.Subsequently, they lost about 10% of coverage and by 2012 were beginning to rebuild.  Now, they are down about 5% from baseline and increasing.  Interestingly, there are a number of theories that the 1979 baseline year was about 10% above the historic norm.Climate change (weather pattern changes) are a reality and have been happening for many decades; actually centuries.  Overall, the environmental movement and adherence to climate change dogma has cost individuals their life savings, communities their way of life, and taxpayers million (going on billions) with increased food and energy costs.There are many actions policy makers have done in the past that are having an impact now.  There will be changes in the future dictated by the availability of water.  It is very interesting being involved with the discussions concerning climate change that are not garnering headlines. It is also very interesting to see cause and effect and consequences of the environmental movement being exposed.....

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John Stewart

Carbon Credit Auction Comes Up Short

The EPA has identified carbon as a pollutant and a "carbon credit" market has been designed to fund efforts to reduce carbon pollution. California, known for chronic budget shortfalls, was the first state to jump into the carbon market.  Lawmakers and environmentalists envisioned billions of income to plug chronic budget gaps and fund special programs fighting climate change.

As noted in the article from the Sacramento Bee, initial projections of income are falling short.

Like the "derivatives market", the "carbon credit market" is fiction.  The implosion of derivatives resulted in economic chaos.  With auction income falling short of projections, is this another economic calamity in the making?

--Sacramento Bee article--

State environmental leaders this week hailed California's first auction of carbon emissions credits a huge success.

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John Stewart

Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative

The Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative encompasses portions of five states: Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico and Texas, as well as a substantial portion of Northern Mexico. It is topographically complex and includes three deserts (Mojave, Sonoran and Chihuahuan), grass-lands and valley bottoms, and isolated mountain ranges in the southern portion of the Landscape Conservation Cooperative. The richness of the topography leads to equally diverse species composition; the area supports habitat for many native plants, fish and wildlife species, including many endemic species that are extremely susceptible to climate change.

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John Stewart

Little Change in Drought Over 60 Years

A new paper out in the current issue of Nature finds little evidence to support claims that drought has increased globally over the past 60 years. The authors write:

Drought is expected to increase in frequency and severity in the future as a result of climate change, mainly as a consequence of decreases in regional precipitation but also because of increasing evaporation driven by global warming. Previous assessments of historic changes in drought over the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries indicate that this may already be happening globally. In particular, calculations of the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) show a decrease in moisture globally since the 1970s with a commensurate increase in the area in drought that is attributed, in part, to global warming. The simplicity of the PDSI, which is calculated from a simple water-balance model forced by monthly precipitation and temperature data, makes it an attractive tool in large-scale drought assessments, but may give biased results in the context of climate change6. Here we show that the previously reported increase in global drought is overestimated because the PDSI uses a simplified model of potential evaporation that responds only to changes in temperature and thus responds incorrectly to global warming in recent decades. More realistic calculations, based on the underlying physical principles that take into account changes in available energy, humidity and wind speed, suggest that there has been little change in drought over the past 60 years.

What does this mean?

Original linkOriginal author: Roger
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John Stewart

Climate Change Report Released

Climate Change in Grasslands, Shrublands, and Deserts of the Interior American West: A Review and Needs Assessment

FORT COLLINS, Colo., Aug. 27, 2012 - Climate change poses as much risk to public and private grassland and shrubland ecosystems as it does to forested ecosystems yet receives less attention by the public and key stakeholders. Consequently, most climate change research concentrates on forested ecosystems, leaving grassland and shrubland managers with insufficient information to guide decision making. The USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station published a comprehensive report summarizing climate change research and potential effects on grassland, shrub, and desert ecosystems. The report, “Climate Change in Grasslands, Shrublands, and Deserts of the Interior American West: A Review and Needs Assessment,” highlights current knowledge and future research essential to mitigate the prospective detrimental effects of climate change. It addresses animal, plant, and invasive species models and responses, vulnerabilities and genetic adaption, animal species and habitats, and decision support tools for restoration and land management.

Original linkOriginal author: Press
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