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Joe Micciche

Porting the Superflow MV50 Compressor

The piston upon initial disassembly

I wanted to find out whether there was anything wrong with mine, and whether I could do anything to get sustained flow again. For disassembly, all that is required is a 4mm allen wrench or driver for the head bolts, and a 14mm wrench for the output fitting.

 
Disassembly of the compressor piston and head takes a minute. Once the four studs are removed, everything else can be removed by hand. Not surprisingly, when I pulled the piston head off, I found very visible signs of overheating. I cleaned up the piston, the skirt, and the head, and used a very thin application of high-quality grease on the piston.

After studying the head for a few minutes, it became obvious that there was room to port the intake and output ports. Each port is covered by a flexible steel flap, and when the piston is on the downstroke the flap opens to allow air in to the chamber. Then when the piston is on the upstroke, the compressed air forces open the output flap. These flaps make excellent templates for the porting.

Using a router bit on a Dremel, I removed the rib and a bit of extra material on the intake port for a roughly 25% gain in flow capacity. I used the Dremel to effectively double the size of the output port.

 After a good cleaning, I reassembled the compressor, and using parts from leftover projects installed a brass, barbed output; and a new coiled hose (the original hose fittings leaked at the assembly that is screwed onto the valve stem). Then I sourced a zooty Type R filter to replace the original plastic and sponge filter for more airflow and a touch of bling.

The MV50 is rated at 150 psi and 2.5 CFM and when new, it could inflate a 33" tire from 18psi to 35psi in roughly 3 minutes. After this cleaning and porting, the MV50 sustained airflow over multiple fills and consistently aired my 33's from 18psi to 35psi in just over two minutes per tire. This is a very satisfactory result for 1 hour of time and $7.

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Steven Lutz

Swapping an Atlas Transfer Case Input Shaft

Instead of shipping the transfer case back to Advance Adapters, I decided to replace the input shaft myself. Replacing the input shaft myself saved time from not having to wait on shipping both ways and gave me the opportunity to write a "how-to" which will hopefully help someone out in the future.

Advance Adapters sent the 31 spline input ring assembly with the bearing and seal installed already. This eliminated the need to press out the input bearing and replacing it along with the input seal. Before the 31 spline input goes in, we obviously need to take out the 23 spline input.

The first thing I need to do was get the Atlas on a work bench and flip it upside down without damaging the breather. You can either remove it or put the Atlas on a block so it doesn't sit on the breather. You will see the the inspection cover being held on by 14 bolts. Remove these and remove the inspection cover by utilizing the pry points on each end.

Once the inspection cover is removed, you will need to remove both the front and rear cluster pin bolts then push the cluster pin out from the front while holding the cluster gear with one hand. Lift the cluster gear from the case being careful to not let the needle bearings fall out from inside the cluster gear. Once the cluster gear is set aside, remove the two thrust washers.

Once the thrust washers are set aside, remove the 6 bolts holding the input ring to the Atlas housing and remove the input ring assembly. Remove the drive gear from the input assembly by first removing the snap ring then the drive gear. Advance Adapters says this is a light press fit, but sometimes it can be pulled off by hand. Install the drive gear onto the 31 spline input assembly and make sure the snap ring is seated in correctly.

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Clay Vitus

Installing a Gorilla 10,000 lbs. Winch on a Mitsubishi Montero

The most important part of a winch installation is choosing the right location for mounting. The front bumper area is the most logical choice, but beyond that, where in the front bumper area should it be located for the best access for use and the most protection from street and trail damage is the question.

As you can see pictured at right, I chose to mount the winch as low between the frame rails as possible without protruding below. I chose this location for several reasons. First, the finished winch install will not inhibit airflow to the radiator. Second, this location allows for a much cleaner looking installation and retains the use of the factory front bumper. Third, mounting in this manner makes it much more difficult for someone to steal.

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4x4Wire Tech Archive

4x4Wire General 4x4 Tech Articles and Information Archives

Versatile Hardmount Onboard Air System - With proper preparation, designing and installing a versatile onboard system that looks as good as it performs can be quite rewarding. Using common parts, this article walks through a well-designed OBA system which integrates well with the vehicle, while maintaining options for future expansion and uses beyond airing up tires.

Portable Onboard Air Installation - This article describes an onboard air setup that is inexpensive, versatile, and portable. If you your 4WD is a daily driver and you don't want to permanently give up the space required for an OBA system, and you want to keep your A/C compressor, this will give you great ideas on how to build your own portable OBA system.

Tips for improving the Dana 300 transfer case - If you're rebuilding a Dana 300 transfer case, there are several easy and very effective modifications you can make at the same time: add an oil level sight tube, add FWD Hi-Range capability, replace the pressed-in vent tube, and replace the stock hex head bolts which can damage the case.

Nuts and Bolts about Fasteners, Chapter Two - Nuts - In this installment of our discussion about fasteners, we'll travel into the boring but equally as critical properties of nuts and washers. We'll show you the different types of nuts that are common to our assemblies and modifications. 

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4x4 Truck Tech (Archives)

4x4Wire Full Size 4x4 Truck Tech and Archives

Mud Truck? Yes. Show Truck? HELL NO! - Dave Niles' Chevy Pickup is built to play in the mud in a most serious way. With a Dana 60 front axle, Detroit Locker equipped 14 bolt rear, cut 44" Boggers on the back, 44" TSLs on the front, a big block, Turbo 400, divorced NP205, and a flexy suspension, Dave is ready for just about anything he might find in a mud bog.

Rockstomper Rock Rods - Rockstomper makes extra heavy duty tie rods and drag links for many applications, but their Early Bronco steering links are available with bracketry to mount them over the steering arm, improving strength and location relative to stock.

Ford Telescoping Towing Mirrors - Ford's optional mirrors stretch out to the sides to provide much better side and rearward visibility, while retaining all the electric adjustability and manual fold-away features of the stock side mirrors.

LockRight Install on a Dana 80 Hybrid Rear Axle - Finding traction-aiding differentials is difficult for Dodge's biggest rear axle, which is a hybrid that uses Dana 70 axles shafts mated to a Dana 80 differential. PowerTrax makes a LockRight that adds traction to this super-heavy duty off-highway platform.

Torque Converter Lockup Switch for Late Model Automatic Transmissions - Many manufacturers use a locking torque converter on automatic transmission-equipped vehicles for better highway fuel economy. The on-board computer controls a locking solenoid, and this article describes installation of a manual switch with the same function for off-road use, specifically on late-model Mopar trucks like the Dodge Ram.

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OutdoorWire, 4x4Wire, JeepWire, TrailTalk, MUIRNet-News, and 4x4Voice are all trademarks and publications of OutdoorWire, Inc. and MUIRNet Consulting. Copyright (c) 1999-2019 OutdoorWire, Inc and MUIRNet Consulting - All Rights Reserved, no part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without express written permission. You may link freely to this site, but no further use is allowed without the express written permission of the owner of this material. All corporate trademarks are the property of their respective owners.